Would like to find out if anyone else has been approached to lease recently?  What are the terms offered?  I’m curious if someone knows more than I do about productivity in Marion county if if this is just exploratory.  Thanks for any insight .  Vickie M.

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Now you're in the right place, Vickie.  I look forward to hearing from the Marion County members.

There has been some in the Eastern side of the county. Have you been approached to lease?

Yes I have.  It is my understanding that there is renewed interest and we may be in a new “hot” spot.  I don’t want to counter myself out of a lease, but I received a larger per acre bonus in 2013 when I leased.  Since the area is becoming more attractive, I obviously would like to make sure I don’t leave anything on the table.... does that make sense?  My offer was very standard

Having as much knowledge of which companies are active and where is valuable for the purpose of managing your mineral asset.  Of course, the company or companies offering leases may be "land companies" leasing for a client so it is important to know a little about the Texas Railroad Commission's database to know when well permits are approved in your area.  On the ground intelligence for well pad construction and/or pipeline work is valuable.  As always I'm going to throw in my suggestion that mineral owners seek out the closest real O&G attorney or firm.  Those who are reluctant to spend a few hundred dollars are prone to make mistakes worth tens of thousands.  If the leasing program covers a good size area, chances are those lawyers have already heard from land owners in your area and have communicated with the company offering leases.  They may know what lease terms others have received.  Spread the word about GHS and encourage family, friends and neighbors to join and share what they know here.

Same company or different from 2013?

Different,

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