Trinity Operating created the HA RA SUXX (Haynesville Shale drilling unit for Sections 33-19-14 & 4-18-14) and received state approval for 4 horizontal wells.  Then Trinity drilled the Ramsey Company LLC #1, a vertical Smackover (SMK) well.  So, why a Smackover test?  We've seen SMK wells drilled in HA units before but that was in the very early days of the Haynesville Shale development.  It seemed then that the interest was less in the SMK and more about drilling completely through the Haynesville interval to establish the thickness of the target and to generate science to inform the landing depth of the lateral. 

The 19 North Townships, 16, 15, & 14 West, are considered the northern economic margin of the shale portion of the Haynesville Formation based on earlier wells drilled in the upper half of those townships.  Is Trinity looking at the production potential of the SMK in the Ramsey well?  Or, is Trinity looking to determine that Section 33 has viable Haynesville shale?  I'm sure that mineral owners in HA RA SUXX would like to know.  The Ramsey #1 reached total depth on July 25.

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That well, per Trinity is a stratigraphic science test well.  They are only collecting data and will not complete it. Many early HA wells were permitted as Smackover wells because the Smackover lime sits just below the HA shale.  Once you reach the Smackover, you are out of the shale facies.  They may evaluate the Smackover to see if it has any merit to try and make up for their less than stellar HA wells this far north.  At total depth of 11083' they ran a full suite of logs along with a Dipole Sonic which is used for seismic control.  They then took core samples from 10552 thru 10905'. These depths for cores would be in the HA shale section of the well. There is a straight hole log on a PetroHawk well one mile north in Section 33 which shows the top of the HA at 10600' so there is no mystery about the section that they cored.  Trinity hopes the music does not stop before all of the chairs are taken.  

Thanks for the details, ShaleGeo.  That was along the lines that I was thinking.  Trinity has pushed the shale fairway about as far north as it will go and be economic.  Or maybe not considering your comment on less than stellar well results. The decision based on the science in the Ramsey well may also have relevance for other nearby units, SUPP and SUKK.

253499

RAMSEY COMPANY LLC

1

01

 

T4080

6220

6-JUN-22

033-19N-14W

 

 

11276

253500

HA RA SUPP;TUPPEN 36-25 H

1

01

 

T4080

6220

6-JUN-22

035-19N-16W

 

 

21650

253501

HA RA SUKK;TUPPEN 35-26 H

1

01

 

T4080

6220

6-JUN-22

035-19N-16W

 

 

21650

Agree, thanks for the info/opinions.    Iris....HA RA SUXX   Section 4 T18N R14W

Does it make any difference that the  Ramsey well (test) was in Section 33, and not in Section 4? Or Unit 4?

Probably not.  Trinity wants to drill long laterals for economic reasons.  If the company deems that Section 33 is not economic to drill, that may impact the company's decision to  develop Section 4.

The HA in this part of the basin is thinner and has more clay content and less porosity.  All of this leads to less gas in place and therefore less recoverable gas.  Trinity is attempting to make the wells work where Petrohawk, Anadarko, and a whole host of others could not.  Maybe with loads of frac proppant and good gas prices they can.  But I have my doubts that this part of the basin is truly economic for the operator.  

Thank you Skip Peel and Shale Geo, both for the information/update on the area well possiblities.  The test or information was not completed until July 25th on HA RA SUXX?  Also what is frac proppant? Its the proppant part I am questioning.  I have some knowledge of what fracking is.

The 25th. was the last date that the operator reported to the state.  The rig was finished drilling.  The type and  timing of all the science is not covered in the state report.  Proppant is the sand that is injected into the well to hold open the fracks created by the water under high pressure that fractures the rock.  The clay content is important as the more clay, the less brittle the rock.  It will not fracture as well and the fractures tend to close up more thus the need for higher proppant loads.

Wow!  Fascinating to know.  Thanks so much for explanation.  Even before I even knew about the  Haynesville Shale a relative was driving trucks for Barnett Shale so at least I was aware of the natural gas component.  It surprises "me" that the more I learn about the shale and gas drilling that it so interesting and not just the money motivation.  I know my yard here in Florida has a large clay content.

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