NG prices vary from state to state and I was surprised that Texas and Louisiana were not the lowest for residential customers.  Although, Louisiana was the lowest for industrial NG prices. 

 

https://www.chooseenergy.com/data-center/natural-gas-rates-by-state/

Looks like Hawaii could maybe be a customer for LNG?

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Generally the best areas for natural gas prices are in proximity to supply with little connection to markets.  That's how you get some mid-Western states near the Bakken (N. & S Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming) and some states near the Utica/Marcellus (Illinois, Ohio) with lower than average prices.  Both those basins have logistical problems with getting gas to hubs with higher demand.  If Texas was just the WaHa hub in west Texas, it would also be among the lowest.

Correction. Generally the worst areas for natural gas prices are in proximity to supply with little connection to markets. That's how you get some mid-Western states near the Bakken (N. & S Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming) and some states near the Utica/Marcellus (Illinois, Ohio) with lower than average prices. Both those basins have logistical problems with getting gas to hubs with higher demand. If Texas was just the WaHa hub in west Texas, it would also be among the lowest.

Skip, I guess the "best" or "worst" depends on if you're the seller or if you're the buyer.  Either way, it looks like the mineral owners will have to get use to low prices for some time to come.  

More access to supply should drive prices down for consumers even more.  We'll probably see "free NG" in many areas with consumers paying only delivery cost.

Max, the key to wide adoption of natural gas is a low, stable price.  Before the fracking revolution, the primary complaint for not adopting natural gas was its price volatility.  And thus there were fewer pipelines connecting end users.  I worked as an inventory inspector on a long distance Texas Eastern transmission pipeline in the mid-70s in West Virginia and Pennsylvania.  There were no, as in zero, residential or commercial users tied into the 80 miles of line I worked on and no plans for any.  The line was headed to east coast industrial customers. 

Now that climate change concerns are serving to get rid of coal, domestic natural gas use will increase.  Increased exports by pipeline and LNG will help support the price.  It simply appears that for the near term as demand increases, supply will always be ahead.

Skip, I do remember the high NG prices back in the 70's.  The power company that I worked for switched to coal because of those high prices and other factors. 

There were times that some of the gas units couldn't be started up because the gas utilities had to supply gas to residential customers before industrial customers and there wasn't enough for everybody.

The company would buy a set amount of gas each year and hoped that there wasn't too many hot days in August.  If they still had some gas left from the summer, they would schedule our shutdowns according to how long they could run those gas units.

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